A Free-Flowing Failure

Contrary to what you might expect, air will escape from a low-pressure hose faster than from a high-pressure hose because of the low-pressure hose’s wider opening.

Contrary to what you might expect, air will escape from a low-pressure hose (left) faster than from a high-pressure hose (right) because of the low-pressure hose’s wider opening.

Coming to Grips with Symptoms

A diver had odd sensations in her hand but she wasn’t too concerned…until complications arose. Read more about this diver’s story.

Female diver holds a camera

Full Treatment

Emergency oxygen is only the first step to treating suspected cases of decompression illness. Read more about this serious diving incident.

Bald and bearded man stands outside a hyperbaric chamber and monitors it

Left at Sea

When diving offshore, always carry emergency signaling devices such as a surface marker buoy, signal mirror and emergency strobe.

A group of divers pose in the water. They are holding an emergency signaling device.

A Different Kind of Souvenir

Dengue fever is a mosquito-born infection and infection rates are rising in certain parts of the world. A diver unfortunately contracted dengue fever while on a trip.

Mosquito sucks blood from a human

Know the Risks

Nitrogen narcosis can lead to deadly consequences. Understanding the risk factors and ensuring that you and your dive buddies have discussed how to mitigate risk can potentially save lives. If you are stung by a jellyfish, watch for symptoms associated with Irukandji syndrome. If symptoms develop, know that it is a potentially deadly condition that doctors can help treat. Pay attention to local marine life bulletins and announcements. The best ways to mitigate jellyfish envenomation risk are to wear full exposure suits and avoid jellyfish when they are prevalent in the water.

Wearing appropriate exposure protection and being aware of the marine life where you are diving will help you reduce the risk of injury from underwater hazards.

An Unexpected Earplug

Ear barotrauma (pressure-related injury) usually occurs in divers’ middle ears, often as a result of congestion. In this unusual case, however, a diver experienced ear barotrauma that resulted from accumulation of ear wax in his ear canal.

A doctor inspects a man's right ear

Trust But Verify

Ensure your dive shop has properly trained and certified technicians. One couple dealt with a terrible ordeal because their scuba cylinders were improperly checked. Read more about the incident.

Badly injurred diver lies in hospital bed near nurse

Don’t Bite the Hand That Feeds You

With adverse events, there is almost always a cascade in four phases: the trigger, the disabling agent, the disabling injury and the cause of death. Individually, each event is avoidable. Recognizing one at the time of occurrence is an opportunity to react and attempt to mitigate the risk before it becomes a problem. In root cause analysis of adverse events, the most significant factors are the lack of recognition and failure to react to the event.

diver feeding tiger shark

Barotrauma in Bonaire

A 38-year-old diver suffered from a burning sensation in his throat and had discomfort in his neck. The diver had pulmonary barotrauma. Read more about his incident.

A man clutches his chest in pain.